Fizzikal

PE Sport and Physical Activity in Scotland and beyond

Archive for June, 2008

Dartfish Users Conference Engaging The Video Generation

Posted by drilly on June 22, 2008

I was invited to present at the Dartfish users conference at Bedford University. I had 2 inputs to the day and was able to attend some of the other sharing practice sessions. Yet again I picked up some more tips, short cuts and uses of some of the more advanced features. You can view my first presentation via slideshare below

After my presentation I attended a couple of sessions led by Neil Melville which were excellent the first was about sharing analyser projects and the second was about using the measurement and data tools. You can learn more about using the measurement tools and data tables in this online tutorial. There are some more online tutorials on some of the other Dartfish features available here.

My second presentation was all about extending learning beyond the classroom through the use of online spaces and tools. I promised the delegates that they would not have to take any notes (other than the address of this blog) as I would write about my presentation and post links to everything I made reference to through the blog. I deliberately set out not to use a PowerPoint presentation as I wanted to demonstrate that you can deliver your content through other vehicles. I also wanted the delegates to return to my blog to experience for themselves what I was trying to get across i.e. you can extend the learning and the engagement with your learners beyond the restrictions of the actual lesson/presentation. By coming back to the blog the delegates have the opportunity to: read this post and reflect, click on the links to learn more and do further research or post comments to me thus extending the impact of the conference and this is exactly what our pupils doing in a number of schools. If you are a conference delegate welcome back if not read on anyway you might find something that engages you.

I was conscious that my workshop had a slant towards PE and not every delegate was from a PE or sports background, but all that I talked to could be replicated for any subject. I started by visiting the Learning and Teaching Scotland PE website and directed the group towards this case study about using blogs and wikis as there are links to videos and tutorials on how to set up a blog and information about wikis. 

I then introduced the wonderful free  web tool delicious to create online book marks for sites that you find interesting and useful it can then be accessed from any computer with an Internet connection. For a simple guide watch the video below (You probably will be unable to view the video in school as it is hosted on YouTube). You may find my PE bookmarks  useful. You may want to consider setting this up for your course or in a department to tag interesting sites or share frequently visited sites with pupils and or staff. This can be accessed from any computer with an Internet connection.

 

I moved on to talk about Blogs for those of you who want to know a bit more about blogging I previously posted this video explaining blogginist2_3020003_sport_icon_set.jpgg in simple terms . If you want to give blogging a go check out this set of tutorials for using wordpress the provider I use for this blog. If you look on the “links” section on the left hand side near the top of the page I have links to several PE blogs that you may find interesting.

The main point I was trying to establish is that blogs can provide a fantastic conduit for communication and collaboration with your learners. You can extend the learning beyond the confines of the lesson. Your learners can communicate with you leave you questions or work to look over etc and you can deal with these communications wherever you can get online. At this point I  spoke about RSS feeds and aggregators. You may find this video on using RSS feeds useful. The aggregator I demonstrated was netvibes a great bit of software to keep track of all blogs and websites that have content which is regularly updated. I find netvibes very useful as there are loads of plug ins that you can add and you can personalise it to your own needs and the best bit is that it is web based so if you sign up for your own account you can access it form any computer with an Internet connection. Ideal for use at home and school. Here is a video  about netvibes 

The next part of the presentation focused on wikis the following video (also on YouTube) will help you understand a little more about what a wiki is.

I used the Banchory H/Int2 wiki and explained that the content was there for people to download and use and share as long as they were willing to reciprocate and acknowledge the source. Yet again I was trying to demonstrate how we can use an online tool to extend the learning experience and provide additional support.  Wikis can also offer real scope for collaboration between teachers for resource development and between teachers and pupils for learning. I explained that teachers can sign up for free wikis that are advert free at wikispaces. Wikispaces also has video tutorials to help get you started within their help section.

When I was discussing the wikis I highlighted using Youtube to incorporate inspirational and interesting videos. There is actually a lot of very good content on Youtube and other video hosting sites such as google video. We use the videos as a hook for the pupils and also to make the wiki more attractive and lastly to engage the children though adopting a piece of their own culture. Our pupils are creating their own environments outside school with video, audio text and many other applications in sites such as bebo and myspace and facebook and we want our wiki to reflect some of that cool. I also demonstrated  Youtube annotation showing how value can be added to your you tube videos. This is the direction that Dartfish are moving through the Dartfish Moves platform where you can upload and annotate videos. I was gutted that I had to leave early and could not see the presentation on Datfish moves. Something else for you to check out is the Dartfish channel on YouTube.

I punctuated my first presentation in the morning with videos I had saved to my computer from YouTube using Zamzar. This is a very useful tool as most schools block video sharing sites or you may want to play a video on a laptop in an area with no access to an Internet connection. This article form Wired explains explains some other ways of saving videos to your computer. I like Zamzar as you can save videos to your computer in different formats and you can convert videos to different formats, it can also be used to convert many different types of files and documents from one type to another.

I hope you find this a useful summary of the day and i hope it continues your learning beyond my presentation. Please feel free to post comments about the day or ask further questions for clarification.

Posted in Blogs, CPD, datrfish, Education, Free online tools, ICT, ICT in PE, Learning, LTS, Physical Education, Resources, Secondary PE, Sport, Uncategorized, video, web resources, wikis, Youtube | 1 Comment »

Connected Magazine Article

Posted by drilly on June 20, 2008

The latest edition of Connected  Magazine has been enhanced with some wonderful photos of a particularly good looking PE teacher and not a bad article about using ICT to enhance PE. Article talks about Dartfish Blogs and Wikis and a few other interesting developments. Yeah I know shameless self publicity!!

Download the article ICT IN PE Connected Magazine

Posted in Blogs, datrfish, Education, ICT in PE, Learning, LTS, Physical Education, Secondary PE, Teaching, video, wikis | 1 Comment »

Here We Go Again

Posted by drilly on June 20, 2008

The 2 hour PE target takes another twist it seems like the LA’s are questioning the validity of the target read the full article in the TESS

Posted in Physical Education, Primary PE, Scottish Government, Secondary PE, Teaching | Leave a Comment »

New Case Studies on LTS PE website

Posted by drilly on June 13, 2008

There are 2 new case studies on the LTS PE website the first is about Sports Leaders at Northfield Academy the second is about Sports partnerships in Dumfries and Galloway.

Posted in Education, Health, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Secondary PE, Sport, Teaching, web resources | Leave a Comment »

Youtube Video Annotation

Posted by drilly on June 13, 2008

Here is something really cool that can add value to Youtube videos. Youtube video annotation

Video Annotations are a new way for you to add interactive commentary to your videos! Use them to:

  • Add background information about the video.
  • Create stories with multiple possibilities (viewers click to choose the next scene)
  • Link to related YouTube videos, channels, or search results from within a video
  • All of the above!

You control what the annotations say, where they appear on the video, and when they appear and disappear. Think of all the wonderful possible educational applications for this. Oh that’s right Youtube is blocked in most schools what a pity!

Posted in Education, Free online tools, ICT, Resources, Teaching, video, web resources, Youtube | Leave a Comment »

We Are Few But We Are Many: Another PE Blog is Born

Posted by drilly on June 10, 2008

Andy Cunningham has just alerted me to his PE Blog http://harrisacademype.edublogs.org/ Its great to have another colleague joining us and providing an online area to extend his pupils learning. I like his use of the Youtube clips to provide evaluating questions for the pupils. Another positive educational use of the much maligned site. However I bet the pupils cant access the video clips at school as they are more than likely blocked.

Posted in Blogs, Education, ICT in PE, Physical Education, Resources, Standard Grade, Teaching, video, web resources, Youtube | Leave a Comment »

Sprint Your Way to a Better Volcabulary: Quick Learners!!

Posted by drilly on June 8, 2008

No this is not a CfE “rich task” but is an article about exercise and learning or more precisely exercise intensity and its effects on learning. Unlike the article I referred to in a previous post this one sites the research source, a definite improvement. The article suggests that research on college athletes indicates that after bursts of intense sprinting they were better able to learn and retain information both over the short and long term. The article finishes by stating

This paper illustrates how we could capitalize on some of that compensatory biology to do a little multitasking. Get some quick exercise in, and while you’re recovering teach yourself a new language. I’m not saying this approach will work for everyone, or for every type of learning, but the possibilities are there; and the combinations will be virtually endless.”

Certainly gives me a new understanding of the term “quick learner”. Maybe that’s where I have been going wrong trying to learn some French for my upcoming trip to Switzerland this summer.

Posted in Education, Learning, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Research | Leave a Comment »

Improves Brain Function: Just One of Many Claims We Hold Dear in PE

Posted by drilly on June 8, 2008

I recently read this article http://itsgoodtoyou.info/2008/06/08/physical-fitness-improves-brain-health/ which suggests findings that most PE teachers have held true for decades. Exercise and fitness has much wider benefits than weight management and physical health. The article states:

“It turns out that physical activity actually turns on hormonal support systems in your brain. The activation of these systems strengthens brain circuits that you already have and helps you develop new ones.

Exercise causes a rise in several growth factors in the brain that are responsible for helping brain cells survive and divide into new brain cells, or neurons. Only a couple of brain regions can produce new neurons and exercise increases the amount and rate of neuron production in these regions.

The hippocampus plays a critical role in learning, memory and attention. Exercise induces new neuron growth in the hippocampus and improves performance on several types of cognitive tasks.

Folks that exercise regularly know that they are much more capable of handling stress throughout their day than they are when they don’t exercise. This is, in part, because exercise and stress have opposite effects on the hippocampus and exercise improves your ‘buffer’ to handle the stress.

Studies also show that in addition to exercise’s protective role, it is a valuable therapeutic tool for brain function. Fitness training improves cognitive functions relative to planning, scheduling, task coordination and attention. ”                                                               Originally uploaded by http://itsgoodtoyou.info

I can relate to many of the ideas suggested in the article I know how great I feel after a doing some enjoyable physical activity and the release I get form a hard physical work out. I only wish the article sighted some of the research that it alludes to so I can confirm the veracity of the claims.

This also tends to be the problem with physical education we make a number of claims about the benefits of the subject  most of which are anecdotal and founded on our intuition, observation and belief that it is inherently good. However that is normally as far as it goes research is limited especially in Scotland. Some of us are impassioned about promoting our subject and feel we are having to fight to secure a significant proportion of time in schools curricula. However we have limited proof of the benefits other than the anecdotal. What we need is hard evidence to back up the claims we make about the benefits of PE.

A small minority of enlightened teachers have done or are starting to do some small scale research in their schools. Practitioner based research has the potential to be a powerful medium to inform our colleagues but would it have any standing with the Government or Local Authorities? I would be interested to hear from any colleagues who have or are undertaking any research relevant to PE in Scottish schools.

 

 

Posted in Education, fitness, Health, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Research, Scottish Government, Teaching | 1 Comment »

Non Competitive play leads to more Physical Activity but is it less enjoyable?

Posted by drilly on June 6, 2008

Here is an interesting article that raises questions about the organisation of PE and physical activity for children. The research shows that children who were involved in non competitive games were more active than children who were involved in competitive games. However as you dig deeper you discover that the competitive games were all elimination games e.g. when you lose, or are caught or make a mistake you are out of the game (ie not being active) as opposed to the non competitive games where there was no elimination. I wonder what the results would have shown if the competitive games had been non elimination games?

What was also interesting is that the children were surveyed for self-efficacy, enjoyment, and peer victimisation following both types of games. Results showed that enjoyment was higher following competitive games, although enjoyment scores were high in non-elimination games as well. There were no reports of peer victimisation in either set of games, but were significant increases in self-efficacy after both sets.

The key messages for me are that competition is important for enjoyment, if handled correctly, however we need to promote non elimination games to ensure the highest levels of activity as well. I have expressed my views on competition before in a previous post. The study also highlights the positive benefits from activity within the childrens affective domain and the positive benefits to mental health.

There is also a link within the article to another interesting article ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT HIGHER AMONG MOST ACTIVE KIDS Vigorous Physical Activity Linked to Better Grades The research shows that examination of activity and physical education (PE) compared to academic achievement shows the most active kids more often have better grades.

This begs the question if PE and physical activity (don’t get me started on the difference between them) can have such positive and wide ranging benefits and in light of our appalling obesity and health record in Scotland why are we still having to fight so hard to justify it having a significant time allocation in the curricula of many learning establishments!

Posted in fitness, Health, obesity, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Research | Leave a Comment »

New PE Blog

Posted by drilly on June 6, 2008

Catherine McGourty has just alerted me to the PE blog she has developed for Holyrood Secondary http://holyroodpe.edublogs.org/ Welcome to PE 2.0 and the collaborative environment feel free to help yourself to any of the resources on the Banchory Blogs and wikis, links on the side bar on the left. All I ask is that you credit us as the originators if you use our materials and that you reciprocate by allowing us access to your resources.

Posted in Banchory Academy, Blogs, Education, ICT in PE, Links, Physical Activity, Physical Education, Resources, Secondary PE, Teaching, web resources, wikis | 4 Comments »